Creation Worships God Through Us

I’m happy to see this quote from Leontes of Cyprus in another blog!

Fr. Ted's Blog

“Through heaven and earth and sea,

through wood and stone,

through relics and Church buildings and the Cross,

through angels and people,

through all creation visible and invisible,

I offer veneration and honor to the Creator and Master and Maker of all things, and to him alone.

For the creation does not venerate the Maker directly and by itself, but it is through me that the heavens declare the glory of God,

through me the moon worships God, through me the stars glorify him,

through me the waters and showers of rain,

the dew and all creation, venerate God and give him glory.”

(Leontius of Cyprus – d. 1947,  in Beyond the Shattered Image: Insights into an Orthodox Christian Ecological Worldview, p 126)

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Why Ecotheology?

Thank you to everyone who has followed this blog, and encouraged me to keep it up! It’s been a long time since I’ve posted, partly due to travel (Germany has some really excellent sustainability public policies, by the way) but the posting delay is also partly due to rethinking the structure of what I write here. One primary goal of this blog is to provide an internet-based resource for those interested in the original Christian creation care theology and practices, but I’m realizing it is actually more personal than that.

While visiting  and reading the literature from the Rachel Carson Environmental Humanities Center in Munich, Germany, I came across the excellent writing of Markus Vogt in the RCC Perspectives publication. What he says here has clearly defined my mission in this blog:

“The rediscovery of the [original Christian] ethics of Creation [in the 1980’s] has, however, often been only superficial. Creation is misused as a convenient hook on which to hang sentimental ideas of ecology… serving merely to add weight to ecological imperatives and increase moral pressure.”

THAT is exactly why I focus on ancient Christian Earth-keeping. Creation ethics was an original part of  theology and Christian living. It faded to the background fairly recently as a reaction to the rise of a world-view shaped by Darwin, and so has been somewhat forgotten. Now creation theology and ethics is resurging as a tiny talking point meant to promote a modern environmentalist political policy or lifestyle among Christians. It is often an introduction before a promotion for a product or vote. I find that abhorrent — teaching about sacred practices should not serve as a promotion for a particular worldly agenda! (Even if the theological teachings will ultimately inspire worldly actions of some sort).

I am looking in my own life to live out the Christian calling to be a Priest of Creation, to raise up all of God’s creation to His glory, to be transfigured by His grace. In addition to essays of what I’ve learned, this blog is the chronicle of my journey into an authentic, original practice of ancient Christian Earth-keeping and shamar. Thank you for joining me. I look forward to hearing your comments.