Why Ecotheology?

Thank you to everyone who has followed this blog, and encouraged me to keep it up! It’s been a long time since I’ve posted, partly due to travel (Germany has some really excellent sustainability public policies, by the way) but the posting delay is also partly due to rethinking the structure of what I write here. One primary goal of this blog is to provide an internet-based resource for those interested in the original Christian creation care theology and practices, but I’m realizing it is actually more personal than that.

While visiting  and reading the literature from the Rachel Carson Environmental Humanities Center in Munich, Germany, I came across the excellent writing of Markus Vogt in the RCC Perspectives publication. What he says here has clearly defined my mission in this blog:

“The rediscovery of the [original Christian] ethics of Creation [in the 1980’s] has, however, often been only superficial. Creation is misused as a convenient hook on which to hang sentimental ideas of ecology… serving merely to add weight to ecological imperatives and increase moral pressure.”

THAT is exactly why I focus on ancient Christian Earth-keeping. Creation ethics was an original part of  theology and Christian living. It faded to the background fairly recently as a reaction to the rise of a world-view shaped by Darwin, and so has been somewhat forgotten. Now creation theology and ethics is resurging as a tiny talking point meant to promote a modern environmentalist political policy or lifestyle among Christians. It is often an introduction before a promotion for a product or vote. I find that abhorrent — teaching about sacred practices should not serve as a promotion for a particular worldly agenda! (Even if the theological teachings will ultimately inspire worldly actions of some sort).

I am looking in my own life to live out the Christian calling to be a Priest of Creation, to raise up all of God’s creation to His glory, to be transfigured by His grace. In addition to essays of what I’ve learned, this blog is the chronicle of my journey into an authentic, original practice of ancient Christian Earth-keeping and shamar. Thank you for joining me. I look forward to hearing your comments.

Heart and Soil

seed-soil-heart-

“A farmer went out to sow his seed. As he was scattering the seed, some fell along the path; it was trampled on, and the birds ate it up. Some fell on rocky ground, and when it came up, the plants withered because they had no moisture. Other seed fell among thorns, which grew up with it and choked the plants. Still other seed fell on good soil. It came up and yielded a crop, a hundred times more than was sown.”… “This is the meaning of the parable: The seed is the word of God. Those along the path are the ones who hear, and then the devil comes and takes away the word from their hearts, so that they may not believe and be saved. Those on the rocky ground are the ones who receive the word with joy when they hear it, but they have no root. They believe for a while, but in the time of testing they fall away. The seed that fell among thorns stands for those who hear, but as they go on their way they are choked by life’s worries, riches and pleasures, and they do not mature. But the seed on good soil stands for those with a noble and good heart, who hear the word, retain it, and by persevering produce a crop.”      Luke 8:5-15 NIV

 

Christ gives us the very soil beneath our feet as an image of our own hearts. Next time you scrape mud off your boots, let it (as St Basil said) remind you of God and His lessons to us. Is this soil hard or soft? Rocky and dry? Fertile? Could it grow a mustard seed? Would it produce good fruit? And is your heart like it, able to grow in faith from God’s word? Continue reading