Why Ecotheology?

Thank you to everyone who has followed this blog, and encouraged me to keep it up! It’s been a long time since I’ve posted, partly due to travel (Germany has some really excellent sustainability public policies, by the way) but the posting delay is also partly due to rethinking the structure of what I write here. One primary goal of this blog is to provide an internet-based resource for those interested in the original Christian creation care theology and practices, but I’m realizing it is actually more personal than that.

While visiting  and reading the literature from the Rachel Carson Environmental Humanities Center in Munich, Germany, I came across the excellent writing of Markus Vogt in the RCC Perspectives publication. What he says here has clearly defined my mission in this blog:

“The rediscovery of the [original Christian] ethics of Creation [in the 1980’s] has, however, often been only superficial. Creation is misused as a convenient hook on which to hang sentimental ideas of ecology… serving merely to add weight to ecological imperatives and increase moral pressure.”

THAT is exactly why I focus on ancient Christian Earth-keeping. Creation ethics was an original part of  theology and Christian living. It faded to the background fairly recently as a reaction to the rise of a world-view shaped by Darwin, and so has been somewhat forgotten. Now creation theology and ethics is resurging as a tiny talking point meant to promote a modern environmentalist political policy or lifestyle among Christians. It is often an introduction before a promotion for a product or vote. I find that abhorrent — teaching about sacred practices should not serve as a promotion for a particular worldly agenda! (Even if the theological teachings will ultimately inspire worldly actions of some sort).

I am looking in my own life to live out the Christian calling to be a Priest of Creation, to raise up all of God’s creation to His glory, to be transfigured by His grace. In addition to essays of what I’ve learned, this blog is the chronicle of my journey into an authentic, original practice of ancient Christian Earth-keeping and shamar. Thank you for joining me. I look forward to hearing your comments.

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Heart and Soil: 3 Reasons Compost is Christian Charity

When I compost, it is a joy to see the ways that God’s creation obeys Him, managing and cycling ‘waste’ and decay into new life. These disdained scraps become the essential tool of our Christian work: the means to feed the hungry. What a beautiful symbol compost is- to take the junk, the unwanted, the ‘trash’ and have it become a service in glory! Imagine if we could ‘compost’ our negative experiences this easily, if we allowed God to transform our sins and tragedies into fertile beauty! My compost bin is nature’s icon to remind me of Christ’s resurrection, that through death we are born again.

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Continue reading

Heart and Soil: Perseverance

If you found an icon, an object meant to teach you the faith like a wooden cross or a Holy Bible, broken and trampled and desecrated upon the ground, would you lift it up, respect it and restore it? would you brush off the dust from the bible and take care to make sure others could read this copy of the life-changing Word of God? Would you repaint the cross and hang it where others could see it and be reminded of Christ’s sacrifice?

In Part 1, we discussed that Christ has given us the soil as an icon of our hearts (Luke 8:15), and even that St. John of Damascus teaches indeed the whole creation is an icon. And yet, this “icon beneath our feet” is being devastated by industrial agriculture practices and climate change. So devastated that it is threatening our ability to produce sufficient food for people. Continue reading

Being a Priest of All Creation

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In the 7th ecumenical council of bishops in 787 AD that defined the Christian attitude toward material things, St. Leontes of Cyprus said this about our role in God’s creation:

“Through heaven and earth and the sea,

Through wood and stone,

Through all creation visible and invisible,

I offer veneration to the Creator and Master.

For the creation does not venerate the maker directly and by itself

But it is through me that the heavens declare the glory of God.

Through me the moon worships God.

Through me the stars glorify Him.

Through me the waters, the showers of rain, and the dews of all creation

Venerate God and give Him glory.”

The thought of an inanimate material object such as the moon giving glory to and worshiping God strikes many of us as strange in itself. But the thought that not only do the forests praise Him and the stars sing of His glory, but that they do so somehow through *my* mediation might sound downright un-Christian. And yet, it is an essential aspect of our vocation as the ‘priesthood of all believers.’ Ancient Christianity taught that our relationship with the earth is more than a managerial stewardship; we are each the priests of creation. But what does it mean to be a priest of creation?

While a priest fulfills many roles, the primary duty is to celebrate the sacraments and lead others into sacramental living. A fundamental characteristic of the sacrament is that we (people created by God) take natural materials (some bread, water, wine, and oil created by God) and offer it back to Him in thanksgiving. In offering it, we also ask that it be blessed as a means of imparting His love and mercy to us, a means of two-way communion. In the great sacrament, the parish priest speaks the words Christians have spoken in worship service since before 370 AD: “Thine own of Thine own we offer unto Thee on behalf of all and for all.” We reach up; God reaches down. 

In sacramental worship, both creation and Creator are present and active, while the role of the priest is to be the intentional link between them, the mediator that holds the middle ground. The priest both lifts up created beings and brings down God’s blessing, creating unity and reconciliation. We are material beings made in the image of God, and are thus that link between physical creation and the uncreated God. This means our priestly responsibility to creation is not a calling to selfishly exploit it, nor even to merely take care of it, but to offer it back to God. When we do this, creation becomes far more than the means of our subsistence; it becomes the medium of our communion with Christ, our expression of thanksgiving, blessing, sanctification and salvation.

Paul explains to us in Ephesians 1:10 that it is God’s desire for all of creation to be reconciled to Him, saying the plan revealed is  “…to unite all things in Him, things in heaven and things on Earth.” We have an important role in God’s plan. As Jesus unified human and divine natures in himself, blazing a trail for us humans to be unified with God, so we as humans unite the dust and the Spirit. We become one with God as we are transformed by life in Christ; the rest of creation becomes one with God through our mediation.

As members of the ‘priesthood of all believers’, one element of our vocation is to participate in the sanctification of the earth through our daily sacramental living. Stewardship of resources may be one of the many responsibilities of a priest, but is not the whole end of it. As priests, we are called to sanctify the earth through our direct communion with God.

While in line to receive  communion in Orthodox parishes, it’s common to hear a hymn exhorting other creatures to participate in the worship. Often, at the very moment my lips receive Christ’s body and blood and I am mystically unified to Him, I am hearing from Psalm 148:

Praise the Lord from the earth,
  you great sea creatures and all deeps,
fire and hail, snow and mist,
    stormy wind fulfilling his word!…

Mountains and all hills,
    fruit trees and all cedars!
Beasts and all livestock,
    creeping things and flying birds!…

Let them praise the name of the Lord!…”

Psalm 148’s lyrics reminds us of St. Leontes of Cyprus’ teaching and helps us practice it: “Praise Him, sun and moon! Praise Him all you shining stars!” Singing this psalm as we approach the chalice, we carry those inanimate and material, but beloved, creations of God’s back up to Him, so that through us, they may worship Him too.